8650 W. Tropicana Avenue, Ste. B-107, Las Vegas, NV 89147

Phone: 702-871-1152

Fax: 702-262-7000

Featured Articles

Posts Category: LVVSC News

Information on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Canine Mast Cell Tumors

LVVSC Oncologist Dr. Andrew Vaughan wrote this article on the diagnosis and treatment of canine mast cell tumors. Canine Mast Cell Cancer Mast cell cancer is the most common skin cancer in dogs. It is encountered most frequently in middle-aged to older dogs of many different breeds.The most commonly affected breeds are Pugs, Boxers, Bulldogs, and Boston Terriers but any breed can be affected. There may be an association between the development of mast cell cancer and prior chronic inflammation…

Trichiasis

What is Trichiasis? Trichiasis is a condition where normal hairs have grown inward towards center of the eye and rub on the cornea or the conjunctiva causing irritation. This may lead to ulceration of the cornea. Theses hairs are located in the medial canthus, where the two eyelids meet near the nose. What animals are affected? Dogs have a higher incidence rate over cats, particularly younger dogs. The breeds most commonly affected are pugs, shih-tzus, bulldogs, and lhasa apsos. Any…

What are Cataracts?

What are cataracts? By Dr. Weinstein A cataract is any opacity within the lens. There are different levels of cataracts. The first is called an incipient cataract: the opacity is so small that it is not yet affecting vision. An immature cataract takes up more space in the lens and can cause blurred vision. A mature cataract gives the eye a cloudy appearance and causes vision loss. The final stage for a cataract is called a hypermature cataract. At this…

What is KCS?

By Dr. Weinstein What is KCS? KCS (Keratoconjunctivitis sicca), also known as dry eye disease, is a condition where the cornea is inflamed due to insufficient tear production. The disease can cause corneal ulcers, scarring, and also pigmentation of the cornea. The cornea is the clear covering of the eye and it needs adequate tear production to keep the eye lubricated, to wash away foreign objects and bacteria, and also to distribute nutrients. Typically this disease has been seen more…

What are Corneal Ulcers?

By Dr. Weinstein What are corneal ulcers? A corneal ulcer is the disruption or loss of the corneal epithelium (the outer cells of the cornea). This condition is usually painful and may cause irritation to the conjunctiva as well. There are three forms of ulcers. The first, called superficial, affects only the outermost layers of the cornea, such as the epithelium. The second type, a shallow-moderate ulcer, can affect up to half of the stroma. The final type is a…

Dr Geels Published in AVMA Journal

Congratulations to our very own Dr. Geels and one of our recent surgery interns, Dr. Moser, on being published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association! If you want to read the abstract of their article, click here to visit the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association online.…

Wolf Surgery at LVVSC

We have countless wonderful clients, and we always greatly appreciate when one of them allows us to share their story. In this case, we have the honor of counting Mr. Caracci in that group. Mr. Caracci tends to wolves that have been rescued from unpleasant circumstances, or given up by owners who were unprepared to care for them properly. Unlike most of us who get to cuddle with our pets every day, his charges require a little more personal space,…

How Accurate is Online Veterinary Information?

In this age of Internet and Web content, consumers are using internet sites to research health information, both for themselves and their pets. As veterinary professionals, we are aware that our clients may have done research prior to or during their pet’s medical treatment, and we welcome the opportunity to discuss your concerns and any information you may have gathered. Due to the freedom of the Internet, available information can often be confusing or even misleading. A study published in…

Rehab: How Can it Help Your Pet?

At Las Vegas Veterinary Specialty Center, our physical rehabilitation department treats a variety of post-operative orthopedic and neurologic patients, facilitating their return to function and gait. Physical rehabilitation is fast becoming the standard of care in veterinary medicine. Did you know that physical rehabilitation has been shown to help our senior and overweight pets as well? At LVVSC, we offer exercise sessions geared towards geriatric patients that may be suffering from chronic arthritis, low energy, and the usual senior aches…

Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment – General Information

Cancer can be a devastating disease for both humans and their animal companions. At the Las Vegas Veterinary Specialty Center’s oncology service, we will strive to provide your pet with the best possible cancer care. We feel that a big part of our job is to educate our clients (pet owners) about cancer itself, the principals of treatment, and the numerous options that may be available for the management of your pet’s cancer. Through our guidance, education and discussion we…